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Searching Blackletter in Regular

Blackletter fonts have a very particular look to them which makes these fonts an absolutely brilliant fit for some projects. The readability of these fonts is pretty variable. This combined with their strongly antique looks means they aren’t suitable for every project.

Blackletter fonts date back to scripts first in use in the early part of the 12th century across Europe. It’s known as a Gothic script and is sometimes described as an Old English typeface. Think of illuminated Latin manuscripts or heavy metal album text and band logo and that is the best way to describe the blackletter look and feel.

The uses for blackletter fonts are pretty specific. Think card-making, printed carol-singing sheets, history project titles and heavy metal band logos. Blackletter lends itself well to Germanic texts. Font Bundles offer downloadable blackletter fonts in a range of European languages including German.

Blackletter is not in common use for business purposes, unless the company has a historic connection. Some leisure and entertainment venues might feel that blackletter fonts align well with their brand image. Contemporary use of blackletter is popular in the newspaper industry with The New York Times and Los Angeles Times featuring it on their publication nameplates. It’s also become quite popular for use in labelling products, particularly on beer labels.

Blackletter fonts are not very readable in body text so only consider their use in headings, logos, posters, titles and signs. The font can also work well on official documents like certificates.

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