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Searching Gothic in Other

Gothic fonts particular appearance, modern and antique combined, makes these fonts an absolutely superb fit for some projects. The readability of these fonts is pretty variable. This combined with their fierce antique look means they aren’t suitable for every project. Gothic fonts are said to have originated in Scandinavia and were popularised by the Bauhaus art movement.

The uses for Gothic fonts can be broad, particularly those fonts that look and feel pretty modern. Think card-making, printed song sheets, history project titles and heavy metal band logos. Gothic lends itself well to Germanic and Scandinavian texts. Font Bundles offer downloadable gothic fonts in a range of European languages including German.

Gothic fonts are used in a lot of modern designs. Product labels, band merchandise, poster titles and in tattoo designs often feature these fonts. They create a strong visual brand.

Gothic is not in common use for business purposes, unless the company has a historic connection. Some leisure and entertainment venues might feel that the Gothic font aligns well with brand image. Contemporary use of Gothic fonts is pretty popular in the music industry. It’s also become quite popular for use in labelling products, particularly on beer labels.

Some of the heavier duty Gothic fonts are not very readable in body text. Other lighter fonts can be used in headings, logos, posters, titles and signs as well as in longer text forms. The font can also work well on official documents like certificates, diplomas, degrees and scroll documents.

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